From:   jemcgloin@verizon.net
Sent time:   Monday, October 10, 2011 8:29:03 PM
To:   september17@googlegroups.com
Subject:   [september17discuss] Interesting stat
 

 According to Rachel Maddow, last month there were 164 mentions of corporate greed on TV news.  This month there are 1,801 mentions of corporate greed on TV news.  Muhahaaahaaa
 
 
On 10/10/11, jemcgloin@verizon.net wrote:
Yes creativity and small events everywhere can be very effective
 
 
On 10/10/11, grimwomyn<grimwomyn@gmail.com> wrote:
ok-- can added to this be the dispersion technique?
http://my.firedoglake.com/wagingnonviolence/2011/09/15/for-occupywallstreet-dispersion-is-part-of-the-plan/

"There are worse things than not getting to have another large public
protest in the streets of New York that accomplishes little. It has
been done before. According to New York City law, permits are
necessary for groups of more than 20 to gather legally in public
parks—so why not gather in groups of 19? Why not conduct small, legal,
and still powerful actions like those that #occupywallstreet activists
have been conducting throughout this week, such as yoga classes where
Wall meets Broad and declaring guerrilla free-speech zones with free
wireless internet access? What if this were happening on every corner
in the city, for weeks at a time?

These days, nobody is more masterful with dispersion tactics than
those behind the Jasmine Revolution in China. Working in an
environment of extreme, ruthless oppression, they’ve learned to be
very creative. Their signature move is the so-called “strolling”
protest: large numbers of people gather at a public place, designated
over the internet, and walk around innocently, looking up at the
buildings and ignoring each other. Obviously, there’s a protest
happening, because there’s a huge crowd of people in one place, and a
phalanx of police are watching. But how do you distinguish a protester
from a bystander? You don’t. You can’t, really. You’ve created a
disruption, but no targets, and no actual illegality. Meanwhile,
people become less afraid to resist when they know that others are
with them."

Activities can be planned, people are inconveniencing the bank, it
would be safer, I can't stomach 13 yr olds getting arrested again. The
NYPD has proven themselves to be mean. There should be a softer
approach... and it will bring more sympathy to the movement if it is
peaceful action.

Dancing on bank lawns in the suburbs, card games in front of chase....
peaceful.....

On Mon, Oct 10, 2011 at 7:49 PM, MAd Hatter <progressivechange@gmail.com> wrote:
> Totally Agree.... #occupythebanks and lets get in the streets this week.
>
>
> As of now, there are 3 public meeting points for Saturday.  Please add
> others that I may have missed. Or form an affinity group and go to a
> bank in the morning! Bring Cameras, do press, and ask for
> supporters......
>
> 11am March on Banks-- from Zucotti and probably (Bowling Green)
>
> 1pm-2pm  Students Meet up at Washington Square Park (visit banks from there)
>
> 5:00pm Take Times Square Mass Convergence
>
>
> Here is the call to action from the October 15th Working group. Let's
> make Saturday something different.
>
> Occupy Wall Street October 15th Call to Action Against Banks.
> --------------------------------------
> The time has come to fight the banks.
>
> We call on fellow occupiers and those who stand in solidarity to join
> us in moving from protest to resistance
>
> No longer will banks take our homes.
>
> No longer will banks rob students of our future.
>
> No longer will banks destroy the environment.
>
> No longer will banks fund the misery of war.
>
> No longer will banks cause massive unemployment.
>  And no longer will banks create and profit from economic crisis
> without a struggle.
>
> The political system has been corrupted and taken over by Wall Street.
>  The banks have destroyed our economy and captured our democracy.
>  Occupy Wall Street is a part of a global movement.  On Oct. 15th and
> beyond, we will take our message directly to the banks.
>
> This saturday, visit your local Bank of America, Wells Fargo, or Chase
> and let them know, we will not allow business as usual.
>
> We.
>
> Will.
>
> Occupy.
>
> Everywhere
>
> On Mon, Oct 10, 2011 at 7:38 PM, beka economopoulos
> <beka@notanalternative.net> wrote:
>> Today Bloomberg announced that we could stay in Zuccotti Park
>> indefinitely: http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2011/10/10/bloomberg-occupy-wall-street-can-stay-indefinitely/
>> And so we went from being an occupation to becoming a picnic.
>> Just yesterday Zizek warned “The only thing I’m afraid of is that we will
>> someday just go home and then we will meet once a year drinking beer and
>> nostalgically remembering what a nice time we had here. Promise ourselves
>> that this will not be the case.”
>> Of course, it's nice to have some breathing room, but we're in this for the
>> long haul.  There are no "solutions" that can be presented quickly to make
>> us go away. And so there will be moments where our presence is no longer an
>> uncomfortable and unknown variable, but rather is normalized and
>> integrated.
>> It's in those moments that we have to push the envelop, pry open the space
>> of possibility even farther. We go as far as we can to destabalize but
>> maintain support and momentum. And when that's the new "normal" then we do
>> it again, we push further.
>> That's how change happens, how we shift the terrain and the terms of the
>> game.  I hope that we can get information out as soon as possible about ways
>> to plug into the international day of action, this Saturday October 15.  And
>> that we continue to expand and take new space and spread and lead the way.
>> xob
>>
>> --
>> New: http://blog.art21.org/2011/05/19/5-questions-for-contemporary-practice-with-not-an-alternative/
>> Not An Alternative
>> http://notanalternative.com
>>
>
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