From:   Andy Anderson <3aeanderson@gmail.com>
Sent time:   Sunday, October 23, 2011 9:56:46 AM
To:   september17@googlegroups.com
Subject:   Re: [september17discuss] Re: From One Seed a Tree Will Grow
 

Thank you again for your encouragement and support.
Peace
Andy

On Sun, Oct 23, 2011 at 10:04 AM, shaista husain <shaistahusain@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks Richard, really appreciate your love of Faiz--and to tie it back to our friend Any Anderson, the lessons of other occupations are so important to our ability to understand our situation. We should think perhaps of getting a Global Democracy group together, where this exchange of information coming from other occupations--is furthered, since we are all isolated, we can't always see the forest from the trees until we see how are struggles are part of each others' ..Andy, please keep on doing what you are doing, that was the point of the poetry--and we are listening to you.
Peace,
Shaista



On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 9:59 PM, Richard S. <chardsinger@yahoo.com> wrote:
Thanks.  Yes, I thought the Laal video would be appreciated by OWS for
its scene of police brutality followed by collective nonviolent
resistance. :)

Faiz is great, though I wish I could read him in the original Urdu
(maybe some day).

Trying to remember when I first heard of him...  Possibly back in the
'90s, from a certain Pakistani woman who was my girlfriend for about
half a year.

More recently, in the mid 2000s, while I was living in Jackson
Heights, I really got into old Indian and Pakistani films and music,
and I spent lots of time in those DVD stores.  I also started a blog
on the subject, and some of my readers taught me a lot more.

At some point I pretty much fell in love with the voice of Noor Jehan,
the woman singing (but not the woman shown) on the second video I just
posted.  (She's the person I'm most likely to be listening to when you
see me wearing headphones on the Staten Island Ferry.)  She was a
Bollywood singing star in the 1940s, then she became a Pakistani
singing star in the '50s and then a playback singer and famous singer
in general from the '60s to her death in 2000.

A couple of years ago, I read about Noor Jehan's friendship with Faiz,
whose poems she sang against a government ban while he was serving
jail time in the '50s for participating in a conspiracy to overthrow
the right-wing government.

I started searching around for other musical renditions of Faiz's
poems; that's when I found the video by Laal.

There's just one more poem I wanted to mention, which I think everyone
should check out...  It's "Hum Dekhenge."  Here's a link with a
translation to the poem and a performance by the woman who is probably
best known for singing this one, Iqbal Bano (who also, btw, had sung
for '50s Pakistani films):

http://www.nme.com/nme-video/youtube/id/RQBr7m0n0Zo/search/iqbal-bano

Anyway, hope that I didn't just once again post too much
autobiography.  But I figured some people might wonder how this "white
male" (with a Jewish last name, no less) would end up being so well
acquainted with this stuff.

I think that one advantage to living in a global city like New York -
at least for the people who've had the chance to get around the city
enough - is that we can be influenced by a whole variety of cultures
and thus end up being at least somewhat internally multicultural, so
that we are much more complex than sometimes is assumed by people who
are very into identity politics.

Anyway, I do love Faiz!  Inquilab zindabad.

Richard



On Oct 22, 8:50 pm, jemcgl...@verizon.net wrote:
>  Awesome
>
>  
>
>  
>
>
>
> On 10/22/11,Richard S.<chardsinger@yahoo.com>wrote:Speaking of Faiz Ahmed Faiz...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9GflzRpAeU
> On Oct 22, 4:30 pm, shaista husain <shaistahus...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > YEs, agreed ...in the map of lost lovers...turn on the lights... let's meet
> > here, new york city, the city of many lights...
> >
> > "City of Lights"
> > On each patch of green, from one shade to the next,
> > the noon is erasing itself by wiping out all color,
> > becoming pale, desolation everywhere,
> > the poison of exile painted on the walls.
> > In the distance,
> > there are terrible sorrows, like tides:
> > they draw back, swell, become full, subside.
> > They've turned the horizon to mist.
> > And behind that mist is the city of lights,
> > my city of many lights.
> >
> > How will I return to you, my city,
> > where is the road to your lights? My hopes
> > are in retreat, exhausted by these unlit, broken walls,
> > and my heart, their leader, is in terrible doubt.
> >
> > But let all be well, my city, if under
> > cover of darkness, in a final attack,
> > my heart leads its reserves of longings
> > and storms you tonight. Just tell all your lovers
> > to turn the wicks of their lamps high
> > so that I may find you, Oh, city,
> > my city of many lights.
> >
> > Faiz Ahmed Faiz
> > (Translated by Agha Shahid Ali)
> >
> > On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 4:25 PM, Winter Siroco <wintersir...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > > Speaking of which, perhaps there should be a poet's group at the
> > >http://www.nycga.net/groups/Youjust need to sen and email to Drew
> > > requesting it. Luke and friends may be also interested. It could also be an
> > > independent section in the web page.
> > > Cesar
> >
> > > On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 3:48 PM, shaista husain <shaistahus...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > >> revolution in the service of poetry--never underestimate the power of
> > >> inspiration (inspire to breathe--breath)
> > >> ---Here is a poem by Faiz Ahmed Faiz a revolutionary poet
> >
> > >> It's still distant, but there are hints of springtime:
> > >> some flowers, aching to bloom, have torn open their collars.
> >
> > >> In this era of autumn, almost winter, leaves can still be heard:
> > >> their dry orchestras play, hidden in corners of the garden.
> >
> > >> Night is still where it was, but colors at times take flight,
> > >> leaving red feathers of dawn on the sky.
> >
> > >> Don't regret our breath's use as air, our blood's as oil --
> > >> some lamps at last are burning in the night.
> >
> > >> Tilt your cup, don't hesitate! Having given up all,
> > >> we don't need wine. We've freed ourselves, made Time irrelevant.
> >
> > >> When imprisoned man opens his eyes, cages will dissolve: air, fire,
> > >> water, earth -- all have pledged such dawns, such gardens to him.
> >
> > >> Your feet bleed, Faiz, something surely will bloom
> > >> as you water the desert simply by walking through it.
> >
> > >> (Translated by Agha Shahid Ali)
> >
> > >> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 3:04 PM, Andy Anderson <3aeander...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > >>> Ok, I was confused, that happens sometimes. Did my post show up on maybe
> > >>> someone from OWS being able to skype into our first meeting, still to be
> > >>> announced as to when and where? I know we are autonomous, but getting
> > >>> participation from you all will help build some esteem from a badly cut and
> > >>> bruised work group.
> >
> > >>> Andy
> >
> > >>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 3:00 PM, Doug Singsen <dougsing...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > >>>> I didn't mean that the collapse of Occupy Indianapolis was a good thing,
> > >>>> I was responding to what you said about how "You all have awakened hope and
> > >>>> drive into many of us. Inspiration to me, seems like starting an emotion,
> > >>>> which is good. But by waking those of us up. What you all have started is a
> > >>>> global movement. As we awaken, its our duty to wake those around us." OWS is
> > >>>> just the beginning of a process, a movement that will play out over the
> > >>>> course of the coming years. "Waking people up," bringing people into
> > >>>> political activity and into a recognition of the need to organize and fight
> > >>>> back, is the most important thing we need right now. We need the struggle to
> > >>>> permeate every level of society.
> >
> > >>>> All the people with jobs and families who can't immerse themselves in an
> > >>>> occupation need to be involved in this movement for it to have any chance of
> > >>>> succeeding on any level. And right now we haven't figured out how to do that
> > >>>> yet. The movement is still mostly focused on the occupation itself, whereas
> > >>>> to succeed people need to be able to participate in it no matter where they
> > >>>> are economically or socially. A layer of people who have "woken up" and are
> > >>>> ready to fight, who will spread the virus to others, is the key to the whole
> > >>>> way forward for this movement.
> >
> > >>>> Doug
> >
> > >>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:53 PM, Andy Anderson <3aeander...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > >>>>> Can you explain?
> >
> > >>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:36 PM, Doug Singsen <dougsing...@gmail.com>wrote:
> >
> > >>>>>> This is the best thing OWS could possibly accomplish. I hope this is
> > >>>>>> true everywhere the occupations have taken place.
> >
> > >>>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:24 PM, Andy Anderson <3aeander...@gmail.com
> > >>>>>> > wrote:
> >
> > >>>>>>> Just to explain myself. You all have awakened hope and drive into
> > >>>>>>> many of us. Inspiration to me, seems like starting an emotion, which is
> > >>>>>>> good. But by waking those of us up. What you all have started is a global
> > >>>>>>> movement. As we awaken, its our duty to wake those around us.
> >
> > >>>>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:18 PM, Andy Anderson <
> > >>>>>>>3aeander...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >>>>>>>> Not inspired as much as awakened.
> >
> > >>>>>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:16 PM, shaista husain <
> > >>>>>>>>shaistahus...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >>>>>>>>> insprired by OWS --from one seed a thousand trees will grow....
> > >>>>>>>>>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvHvDH0yWK4
> >
> > >>>>>>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 2:04 PM, Doug Singsen <
> > >>>>>>>>>dougsing...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >>>>>>>>>> exactly
> >
> > >>>>>>>>>> On Sat, Oct 22, 2011 at 1:56 PM,
>
> ...
>
> read more »


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