From:   Jackie DiSalvo <jdisalvo@nyc.rr.com>
Sent time:   Sunday, September 25, 2011 10:55:19 AM
To:   september17@googlegroups.com
Subject:   SPAM-LOW: [september17discuss] Should Blacks Answer Obama's Call To March By Joining 'Occupy Wall Street'?
 

http://crabbygolightly.com/mt/2011 Should Blacks Answer Obama's Call To March By Joining 'Occupy Wall Street'?

IN A ROUSING SPEECH delivered at the 41st Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Annual Legislative Conference, President Obama urged African Americans to keep the faith as African Americans struggle against a 17 percent unemployment rate and 40 percent poverty rate for their children.

"You’ve got to be a little crazy to have faith during such hard times," the President said. "It’s heartbreaking, and it’s frustrating."

Obama said he was "going to press on for the sake of all those families who are struggling right now... [but] I expect all of you to march with me and press on. Take off your bedroom slippers, put on your marching shoes. Shake it off. Stop complaining, stop grumbling, stop crying. We are going to press on."

As it happens the most potent protest to occur in recent decades is occurring at this moment in New York where 'Occupy Wall Street' is calling attention to the U.S.'s "corporate greed and corrupt politics." Eighty protesters were arrested Saturday.

"The enemy is the big business leaders of Wall Street, the big oil company leaders, the coal company leaders, the big military industrial leaders," 21-year-old protester Ryan Reed told the BBC.

A videotape posted on YouTube showed police cordoning protesters with nets. Inspired by the Arab Spring, organizers called for 20,000 protesters to descend on lower Manhattan to protest excessive corporate profits at the expense of workers. Protesters began their campaign on Sept. 17.

Media reporters have described the protesters representing "99 percent" of Americans as predominantly college aged. No doubt they would welcome the company of African Americans struggling to stay afloat following Wall Street's ravishment of the U.S. economy that precipitated the housing -- and economy's – collapse.

 

 

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