From:   Marina Sitrin <marina.sitrin@gmail.com>
Sent time:   Friday, September 30, 2011 8:16:47 PM
To:   september17@googlegroups.com
Subject:   Re: [september17discuss] What is your favorite protest/liberation song?!?!
 

I do too!

M.

 

On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Matthew Presto

<matthew.presto@gmail.com> wrote:

> Anyone have a copy of the IWW's "Little Red Songbook"?

>

> On Sep 29, 2011, at 6:42 PM, Ashley Anderson wrote:

>

> SONGS! Read 'em, listen to 'em, a list we put together with the help of good

> old Peter Yarrow (who sang right before MLK's "I Have a Dream" speech.)

>   http://music.peacefuluprising.org/

> I particularly like "Stand." http://music.peacefuluprising.org/track/stand

> We were just talking about this in the Oct2011 google group!

>

> Ashley Anderson

> Director

> Peaceful Uprising

> 801-652-2971 |

> Tw | Fb

> Core Principles

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 11:16 AM, Jackie DiSalvo <jdisalvo@nyc.rr.com>

> wrote:

>>

>> Will do.

>>

>>

>>

>> ________________________________

>>

>> From: september17@googlegroups.com [mailto:september17@googlegroups.com]

>> On Behalf Of Jon Good

>> Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2011 1:11 PM

>>

>> To: september17@googlegroups.com

>> Subject: Re: [september17discuss] What is your favorite protest/liberation

>> song?!?!

>>

>>

>>

>> Yo, write this up as a formal thing and send it to the occupywallstreet

>> journal

>>

>> On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 1:00 PM, Jackie DiSalvo <jdisalvo@nyc.rr.com>

>> wrote:

>>

>> DON'T BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU'RE TOLD ABOUT THE 60s. WE HAVE A LEGACY.

>> (I think I'd like to organize a forum sometime about the differences and

>> similarities between the 60s' and our present movement)

>>

>> I agree that the 60s did little to fight economic oppression or to ally

>> with

>> the "99%." That's why Occupy Wall Street is much more  progressive than

>> much

>> of the 60s movement; some factions in SDS were virulently anti-working

>> class

>> and many identified youth, not workers, as the ones to organize. I am

>> working class and formed groups in Madison. Wis. to fight those

>> tendencies.

>> We put out a local labor newspaper,  organized truck drivers, met with

>> unions at the School for Workers, set up labor oriented study groups and

>> even got official pro-labor Economics classes.  A book will soon be out

>> about the organizing of working class youth by SDS members, as with Rising

>> Up Angry in Chicago.

>>

>> Of the 60s activists still active, several are in the labor movement. This

>> was particularly true about U of Wis, Madison where graduate student

>> teachers, many of whom were in the radical movement, formed the first

>> graduate teachers' union and had to strike for recognition, shutting down

>> the university in Spring 1970, supported by the radical student movement

>> which had been fighting the university on issues related to the Vietnam

>> war.

>> Not only did that union, stemming from the 60s, lead the public school

>> teachers to occupy the capitol building in 2011, but one of its 60s

>> leaders

>> had become head of the Wis AFL-CIO-- which partly explains why the Wis

>> movement was so advanced - there was a 60s legacy.  Many of the older

>> public

>> school teachers were in school while students were in the streets, their

>> consciousness was effected (all of Madison, including its Congressman was

>> anti-war); in fact, they may have been in the high school contingents

>> which

>> joined us in anti-war marches.

>>

>> Moreover, the Civil Rights movement was working class and M L King's March

>> on Washington was organized in great part by the labor movement, which, as

>> with 1199, the hospital workers, was largely African-American.

>>

>> -----Original Message-----

>> From: september17@googlegroups.com [mailto:september17@googlegroups.com]

>> On

>>

>> Behalf Of guindave@aol.com

>> Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2011 12:16 PM

>> To: september17@googlegroups.com

>>

>> Subject: Re: [september17discuss] What is your favorite protest/liberation

>> song?!?!

>>

>> for once almost don't agree with Jackie not exactly. I agree with Jon

>> as well sort of. We should use Labor Songs, Labor songs adapted by the

>> Civil rights movements is fine(ideally no one is going to listen to

>> this which is fine). I would like to say that culturally the 60s made

>> our society more humane. However economically and this is only very

>> partially because of the new left they sent us backward economically.

>> What I believe is we have to avoided at all costs looking like the 60s

>> and try our best to look like something new. To do this we have to do

>> what tom Haden did in the first place announce and make clear and just

>> put out the as us kids who are silly some times call it "mems" of being

>> different.

>>

>> Solidarity

>> Dave

>>

>>

>>

>> -----Original Message-----

>> From: Jon Good <therealjongood@gmail.com>

>> To: september17 <september17@googlegroups.com>

>> Sent: Thu, Sep 29, 2011 11:09 am

>> Subject: Re: [september17discuss] What is your favorite

>> protest/liberation song?!?!

>>

>> My big problems with adopting the trappings of the 60s movement is that

>> 1) the 60s revolution failed, and 2) all the art and cultural things

>> surrounding it has been totally co-opted for the purposes of making

>> money, 3) we already have enough stuff that thematically links us to

>> the 60s and there are plenty of other awesome movements to connect

>> with, and 4) while it's a cultural touchstone for middle-class white

>> folks and is awesome for bridging the gap between generations within

>> that demographic, it looks absolutely ridiculous to everyone outside it.

>>

>> I like the sentiment of Where is the Love, I think there's just too

>> many lyrics for people to be understood.

>>

>>

>> Something simple, already popular, and NOT related to the 60s hippie

>> movement will have the potential to be fantastically effective.

>>

>>

>> solidarity,

>>

>>

>> Jon

>>

>> On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 9:30 AM, gail zawacki

>> &lt;witsendnj@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

>>

>> Speaking as a granny, I love taking the All We are Saying, Is Give

>> Peace a Chance and changing peace to whatever  - Earth?  It fun to sing

>> and add clangy music to.

>>

>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkZC7sqImaM

>>

>>

>> On another note, I heard on NPR this am that there is going to be an

>> investigation of the pepper spray incident and that made me realize, I

>> bet I know what was going on (I was right behind the girls) which is,

>> that cop deliberately sought the one girl out because she was marching

>> for much of the way topless (fortunately she had donned it prior to the

>> incident).  He's probably kind of a closet perv. and really nasty man.

>>

>>

>>

>> On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 8:49 AM, jason ahmadi

>> &lt;jason.ahmadi@gmail.com&gt; wrote:

>>

>>

>> Hey lovelies,

>>

>> I've been thinking rather than chanting, it would be really cool if we

>> could all sing in unison on one of our marches.  If people like it we

>> could repeat it.  I can make copies at my office so if people want to

>> send me their favorite songs for everyone to sing I could print out

>> some lyric sheets!

>>

>> Let's also try and break free from the old school protest songs (even

>> though I am including "we shall overcome") and try some new stuff like

>> "where is the love?" by Black Eyed Peas.  But don't let that stop you

>> from suggesting those oldies and goodies for me to write down.

>>

>> The grannies shouldn't be the ones having all the fun!

>>

>> Peace and Love,

>> Jason

>>

>>

>>

>>

>

>

 

 

 

--

Seamos realistas, hagamos lo imposible ~ che

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